3 Comments

My Mom Repeats Herself, But She Doesn’t Have Dementia

Understanding Dementia

Understanding Dementia

I care for two parents with dementia and in many conversations I have someone share “My Mom repeats herself, but she doesn’t have dementia.”

I started in the same place several years ago. You just notice something is different, but you don’t know what it is exactly or what, if anything, you can do about it.

I noticed that my mom would repeat herself, and my Dad was less talkative and seemed depressed. Both of my parents had changing behaviors which is a signal that something is wrong. When my parents were first diagnosed, I was confused on the difference between Alzheimer’s and Dementia.

The common office test given is called the mini–mental state examination (MMSE) or Folstein test. It’s 30 questions and is really only going to capture someone who is moderately impaired. The only true early detection system will be your own observations of someone who you know well. My parents scored in the high 20’s over the course of two years – even when the administering doctor could tell something was not cognitively right with my parents. A better understanding of their strengths and weaknesses was revealed when they were given a Neuropsychological Evaluation. This test takes around 2 hours.

I hope you will consider that any change in your parents could be an early warning signal to future more complicated issues — not just cognitive. Please know there are many other things that can cause memory loss that can be easily treated. Start with a visit to the doctor and join them. The more you can do early, the better off everyone will be. Warned.

Additional Resources:

Understanding the Durable Power of Attorney

A fellow blogger Butch shared this post. For some eye-opening reading, check out this Forbes article: Are We Underestimating How Much Help Aging Parents Need At Home?

3 comments on “My Mom Repeats Herself, But She Doesn’t Have Dementia

  1. […] I have been hearing “my mother repeats herself, but she doesn’t have dementia.” I usually will ask one question: “Was she always this way?”  When the answer […]

  2. […] as posed at dementia-related educational events. I first heard it from two girlfriends at lunch and shared a general summary about this question, but wanted to offer a more simple response now that I have been immersed in this community for […]

  3. […] of dementia by following the blog on DealingWithDementia.org. You can visit this page for a deeper explanation of dementia and its many […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: